Archaeologist. Author. President Emeritus of the American University of Rome.

Richard Hodges, OBE, is President Emeritus of the American University of Rome and Professor of Archaeology at the University of East Anglia, UK; he was formerly the Williams Director of the Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, USA. He is the author of many books, including Dark Age Economics, Mohammed, Charlemagne and the Origins of Europe, The Anglo-Saxon Achievement, Wall to Wall HistoryTowns and Trade in the Age of Charlemagne, Goodbye to the Vikings and (with Riccardo Francovich) Villa to Village, all published by Bloomsbury Academic. 

Richard's latest publication is Travels with an Archaeologist: Finding a Sense of Place - you can find a review here.

Latest blog posts

October 26, 2020

The teaching and research of archaeology in British universities has passed through a fifty-year golden age and now appears to be in full retreat. Student numbers are down, teaching faculty are being reduced, and with this research is living off the energy of years pas...

October 2, 2020

Europeans see the USA through a metropolitan prism. Hollywood emphasizes its cities, its cars and its politics. But there is another America that needs to be championed: its great natural parks. For five weeks I have been beside a lake in the Adirondacks in the norther...

October 2, 2020

Twenty years after my biography of the extraordinary archaeologist, Thomas Ashby, was published by the British School at Rome. Now it has become the basis for a sensitive and timely novella by Lucia and Maria Scerrato and published by Valtrend Editore, Naples.

Here is a...

October 2, 2020

Fred Baker has passed far too young. It is hard to take in. He was always a youthful energy, creative and gifted. They were qualities enhanced by his cheerful modesty. Fred was a third culture kid who missed Oxbridge by smidgin and came to Sheffield’s bubbling archaeol...

June 15, 2020

Spring is almost over in Giove and everyone is catching up.

Everywhere the comune is cleaning the grass skirting the edge of the road with a weed-whacker. Something startles the orange clad and masked workman. Looking non-plussed he has killed a snake. He stares at me s...

May 11, 2020

nEU-MED 2: Vetricella: An Early Medieval Royal Property in Tuscany’s Mediterranean, edited by Giovanna Bianchi & Richard Hodges

The second volume of our ERC project in Tuscany’s Maremma has just appeared as an open access monograph, published by Insegna del Giglio of Fl...

May 11, 2020

Darkness had descended on another glorious spring evening. Then a disturbing surprise. A vehicle was slowly grinding its way down the back lane with a loudspeaker, repeating information that at first was incomprehensible. Garbled, fast instructions, momentarily intimid...

May 11, 2020

Twenty years ago today, on the first of May 2000, the Butrint Foundation trustees and directors were generously invited by the Averoff family to spend Greek Easter in their home at Metsovo, in the Pindus mountains of Greece. We were discussing future collaborations in...

April 22, 2020

Iris Cornelia Love who passed away this weekend was a living legend. Despite being a member of the Guggenheim family, and very much part of New York’s salon life, it is as an archaeologist that she is best remembered. Some have even described her as a female Indiana Jo...

February 17, 2020

The popular view of archaeology is that it is done and dusted on the ground, in the trench. Nothing is further from the truth. Analysing the results, then publishing these is the real labour – often as not a labour of love to entice those who enjoyed a summer in an exo...

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