Archaeologist. Author. President of the American University of Rome.

Richard Hodges, OBE, is President of the American University of Rome and Professor of Archaeology at the University of East Anglia, UK; he was formerly the Williams Director of the Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, USA. He is the author of many books, including Dark Age Economics, Mohammed, Charlemagne and the Origins of Europe, The Anglo-Saxon Achievement, Wall to Wall HistoryTowns and Trade in the Age of Charlemagne, Goodbye to the Vikings and (with Riccardo Francovich) Villa to Village, all published by Bloomsbury Academic. 

Richard's latest publication is Travels with an Archaeologist: Finding a Sense of Place - you can find a review here.

December 2, 2019

Destination tourism: how do you attract tourists to places that have genuine history and natural wonders, yet lie off the beaten track? Numerous small-town mayors in Italy have asked me this question? Bitterly conscious of cruel demographics, fewer young citizens, and...

November 29, 2019

Beside the Doria Pamphlij park, off a busy road through Monteverde, lies a sacred bower. Here lies the barn-like 17th-century church of San Pancrazio and a religious nucleus that has later Roman origins.

The church lies close to or occupies a Roman cemetery south of the...

November 28, 2019

A glorious morning for a change and as luck would have it I had an appointment at the Villa Lante in the shadow of Garibaldi’s statue on the Gianiculum.

I deliberately aimed for the Fontanone (Fontana dell’Acqua Paola built in 1612) to take in the view and to my surpris...

November 25, 2019

The Amalfi coast is breath-taking even on a day of torrential rain. Driving waves slam against the Sirens’ islands, Li Galli, crowning them in a fine mist. And so you round the corniche and unexpectedly into Positano, clinging onto the cliff. Four thousand citizens, al...

November 19, 2019

The Ephesos Museum is in the Haus der Geschichte Österreich in Vienna. Excavations over more than a century have produced wonderful sculpture, but this is a kind of lapidary with limited public reach. Then, upstairs is a staggering small exhibition – Buried No Longer…...

November 17, 2019

I first met George Soros in Tirana 20 years ago. His Open Society Foundations had little short of a holy status among young Albanians. The OSF had supported capacity building, and young Albanian professionals grasped the opportunity and started careers that were taken...

October 11, 2019

An exhibition about the Emperor Claudius with a sub-title dedicated to his women is currently on at the Ara Pacis, Rome. I tend not to go to these block-busters, imagining the rooms to be heaving with visitors. Claudius, however, lacks pulling power and so for most of...

October 9, 2019

Just off the busy Oxford to Swindon highway lies one of Europe’s great cathedrals. Great Coxwell barn is not of course a cathedral, but it certainly feels like it. This majestic building, dated by dendrochronology, was roofed with timbers felled in 1291-92 when the cha...

September 30, 2019

I had an epiphany on Friday. I went to see the latest excavations in Rome’s Forum of Peace (the Forum of Vespasian) and a new discovery solved a problem that has been a pivotal point of debate since the very beginnings of Medieval archaeology in Italy.

As I rushed down...

September 25, 2019

Rome has precious gardens and spaces but only in Santa Sabina’s fortified garden (the Parco Savello) can you see the city and consume the voluptuous perfume of oranges at the same time.

Here on the Aventine the September storms have thrashed the orange orchard and cause...

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